Research Groups

The Aggregate began with Hank Dietz and his students at Purdue University, but the research has spread to dozens of other institutions worldwide. The following listing is based on which institutions have participated directly in activities such as our SC conference research exhibits, roughly ordered in decreasing level of participation.


KAOS at the University of Kentucky

The KAOS group at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, is the new lead in The Aggregate. Dietz heads this group as Professor of Electrical Engineering and James F. Hardymon Chair in networking.


CFD at the University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky CFD group is led by George Huang. We have been working very closely with this group... and it was this collaboration that won us a Gordon Bell award. We've helped them build two clusters in the past year, KFC1 and KFC2: Kentucky Fluid Clusters 1 and 2.


Comparative Planetology Laboratory at the University of Louisville

The University of Louisville Comparative Planetology Laboratory, led by Tim Dowling, is working with us to speed-up the complex planetray weather models they have developed. We have also helped them build a cluster called COMPLINE.


Radiative Transfer in Astrophysical Environments

This group at University of Kentucky's Physics and Astronomy department has been developing codes for analysis of radiative transfer in astrophysical environments, especially dust clouds. At this writing, they are still in the initial stages of tuning their code for cluster execution, doing test runs on Opus and KLAT2....


KAGe at Keele University

The MESSAGE group at Keele University in England is using some of our cluster technology to solve problems in applied and environmental geophysics.


PAPERS at Purdue Unversity

The PAPERS project at Purdue Unversity's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering was the lead group for The Aggregate until Dietz moved to the University of Kentucky in Fall 1999. Through an appointment as an Adjunct Professor, Dietz continues to supervise a smaller-scale research effort at Purdue.


The University of Alabama at Huntsville

Will Cohen, an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Alabama at Huntsville, has been working with The Aggregate since he was a PhD student in Dietz's group at Purdue. His focus is primarily on compiler technology. (Note: Will has recently moved to RedHat and is now working on the GCC compiler.)


Computer Communications Research Center at Washington University

The Computer Communications Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, has worked with The Aggregate on a variety of things centering on using aggregate functions to control/schedule optical networks.


Cluster Computing Lab at the University of Pittsburgh

Ray Hoare, the Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering who runs the Cluster Computing Lab at the University of Pittsburgh, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, has been working with The Aggregate since he was a PhD student in Dietz's group at Purdue. His focus is primarily on making higher-performance aggregate hardware.


The Aggregate. The only thing set in stone is our name.